Importance of a Right Mattress

Getting restful sleep

10 Reasons Why Sleeping on the Right Mattress Is Important to Your Health

One of the most important needs your body and mind have is getting restful sleep. Sleeping soundly throughout the night, without any interruptions, keeps you looking and feeling better.

  1. Weight Loss – If you are thinking about going on a diet, you might want to plan an earlier bedtime too. By sleeping on the right mattress, it will help keep your figure. Watching your weight can be as simple as getting a good night’s sleep. Researchers at the University of Chicago found that dieters who were well rested lost more fat, 56% of their weight loss, than those who were sleep deprived, who lost more muscle mass.
  1. Looking Beautiful – Look in the mirror after you wake up from a good nights rest and the reflection will display a healthier more attractive face. Dark circles and bags under your eyes can be avoided with 8 hours of peaceful undisturbed sleep.
  1. Happiness – Sleeping throughout the night without tossing and turning gives the mind the time and ability to rejuvenate. A good nights rest not only improves your physical appearance, it affects your attitude and mood. A good night’s sleep can really help a moody person decrease their anxiety. You get more emotional stability with good sleep. 
  1. Improve your Health – Research indicates that people who get less sleep, six or fewer hours a night, have higher blood levels of inflammatory proteins than those who get more. Inflammation is linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis and premature aging.
  1. Heighten Memory – The next day, superior mental awareness, memory and concentration is gained with a restful night of sleep. During sleep you strengthen memories or “practice” skills learned while you were awake (it’s a process called consolidation. In addition to consolidating memories, or making them stronger, your brain appears to reorganize and restructure them, which may result in more creativity as well.
  1. Living Longer – When it comes to our health stress and sleep are nearly one and the same and both can affect cardiovascular health. Sleep can reduce levels of stress and will give a person better control of their blood pressure. There are an overwhelming number of studies that show that people who routinely sleep for fewer than six hours a night have a higher risk of dying sooner than people of a similar age who sleep for seven or eight hours a night.
  1. Avoid Accidents – The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported in 2009 that being tired accounted for the highest number of fatal single-car run-off-the-road crashes due to the driver’s performance, even more than alcohol!
  1. Be A Winner –A Stanford University study found that college football players who tried to sleep at least 10 hours a night for seven to eight weeks improved their average sprint time and had less daytime fatigue and more stamina. Similarly, five swimmers were monitored as part of a study in 2008, at the end of the study the athletes could swim faster and react more quickly.
  1. Increased Memory – There is no longer any doubt, sleep improves the gelling or consolidation of memory. During deep sleep the brain goes through our impressions of the day in a process vital to memory formation This process sorts, files and organizes the memories of the day. We’ve all heard of sleeping on a problem, in the hope that come morning the solution will be clear. Well scientists have found that when you do this your brain still looks for a solution, even when you’re asleep. Even if you don’t wake up with an answer, a good night’s sleep will equip your brain to assess the problem afresh.
  1. Less Likely to Get ill – Studies show that people who don’t get quality sleep or enough sleep are more likely to get sick after being exposed to a virus, such as a common cold virus. Lack of sleep can also affect how fast you recover if you do get sick. Researchers paid healthy adults $800 to have cold viruses sprayed up their noses, then wait five days in a hotel to see if they got sick. Habitual eight-hour sleepers were much less likely to get sick than those who slept less than seven hours or slept fitfully.